Archive for May, 2010

Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker #2

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Welcome to our video podcast: Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker – Video Show #84.

On a recent trip to the Chateauneuf-Du-Pape, Robert Kenney was able to ask several well-known winemakers one of our usual burning questions: “What’s Unique about Chateauneuf-du-Pape?” – Film editing by Robert Farinhas.

Join us as we hear some philosophical, practical, and whimsical thoughts from some of world’s great winemakers about what they feel makes their region so unique, different or special.

Interviews include:
Julien Barrot – Domaine La Barroche
Vincent Durieu – Domaine Durieu
Francois Giraud – Domaine Giraud
Emilie Boisson – Domaine Du Pere Caboche
Laurence Feraud – Domaine Du Pegau
Alexandre Favier – Domaine Chante Cigale
Veronique Maret – Domaine De La Charbonniere
Nicolas Boiron – Domaine Bosquet Des Pape
Jean-Paul Versino – Domaine Bois De Boursan
Christian Voeux – Chateau La Nerthe
Thierry Sabon – Clos Du Mont-Olivet
Christophe Jaume – Domaine Grand Veneur
Sophie Armenier – Domaine De Marcoux
Mathieu Perrin – Chateau De Beaucastel
Laurent Charvin –Domaine Charvin
Baptiste Grangeon – Domaine De Christia
Isabelle Sabon – Domaine De La Janasse
Bruno Gaspard – Clos Du Caillou
Karine Diffonty – Cuvee Du Vatican
Didier Negron – Roger Sabon
Florent Lancon – Domaine De La Solitude
Frederic Coulon – Domaine De Beaurenard
Isabel Ferrando – Domaine Saint Prefert
Amelle Barrot – Chateau Jas De Bressy
Pierre Fabre – Chateau MontRedon
Vincent Maurel – Clos Saint Jean
Thierry Usseglio – Domaine Pierre Usseglio & Fils
Patrick Vernier – Chateau Cabrieres
Pierre Pastre – Chateau Fortia
Laurent Brotte – Brotte
Andre Brunel – Les Cailloux
Frederic Brunier – Domaine Du Vieux Telegraph
Guillaume Gonnet – Font De Michelle

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Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker #1

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Welcome to our video podcast: Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker – Video Show #83.

On a recent trip to the Chateauneuf-Du-Pape, Robert Kenney was able to ask winemakers one of our burning questions: “If you weren’t making wine, what would you be doing?” – Film editing by Robert Farinhas.

Join us as we hear some philosophical, practical, and whimsical thoughts from some of world’s great winemakers about what they might do if they had never gotten into wine. Interviews include:

Julien Barrot – Domaine La Barroche
Vincent Durieu – Domaine Durieu
Francois Giraud – Domaine Giraud
Emilie Boisson – Domaine Du Pere Caboche
Laurence Feraud – Domaine Du Pegau
Alexandre Favier – Domaine Chante Cigale
Veronique Maret – Domaine De La Charbonniere
Nicolas Boiron – Domaine Bosquet Des Pape
Jean-Paul Versino – Domaine Bois De Boursan
Christian Voeux – Chateau La Nerthe
Thierry Sabon – Clos Du Mont-Olivet
Christophe Jaume – Domaine Grand Veneur
Sophie Armenier – Domaine De Marcoux
Mathieu Perrin – Chateau De Beaucastel
Laurent Charvin –Domaine Charvin
Baptiste Grangeon – Domaine De Christia
Isabelle Sabon – Domaine De La Janasse
Bruno Gaspard – Clos Du Caillou
Karine Diffonty – Cuvee Du Vatican
Didier Negron – Roger Sabon
Florent Lancon – Domaine De La Solitude
Frederic Coulon – Domaine De Beaurenard
Isabel Ferrando – Domaine Saint Prefert
Amelle Barrot – Chateau Jas De Bressy
Pierre Fabre – Chateau MontRedon
Vincent Maurel – Clos Saint Jean
Thierry Usseglio – Domaine Pierre Usseglio & Fils
Patrick Vernier – Chateau Cabrieres
Pierre Pastre – Chateau Fortia
Laurent Brotte – Brotte
Andre Brunel – Les Cailloux
Frederic Brunier – Domaine Du Vieux Telegraph
Guillaume Gonnet – Font De Michelle

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Sustainability in the Vineyards

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In wine growing, the word “sustainability” gets bandied about frequently. So, what’s it really mean? Obviously, sustainability is the ability to continue on…to endure. So, with wine growing the term will usually mean that the grower uses farming methods that are least likely to harm the environment in general, and the farm in particular, so that it may ‘live long and prosper.’ But, philosophically, it actually goes well beyond that basic premise.

Sustainability in wine growing will normally involve both biological and philosophical approaches – such as organic farming or biodynamics, each of which is intended to conserve natural resources, protect and restore natural habitats, and protect the health of those doing the farming, and their neighbors and customers. It’s a lofty goal, but one that makes plenty of common as well as practical sense. So, how does one practice sustainability at a winery or vineyard? We’re glad you asked!

Join us as we talk with Jon Ruel, Director of Viticulture and Winemaking at Trefethen Vineyards, about the differences between terms like sustainably farmed, organic, certified organic, and biodynamic. As a family farm in Napa Valley for over 40 years, Trefethen has been making conscious decisions concerning long-term sustainability.

For more information on Trefethen Family Vineyards: www.trefethen.com

Sponsor: 7th Annual Celebration of Food and Wine : www.balboabayclub.com

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Show #269
(58:09 min 41MB)

The Wine of Alsace

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Wines from Alsace – are they more German or more French? Well, they’re a little of both, owing not the least to its geographical location on France’s eastern border and on the west bank of the upper Rhine adjacent to Germany. Vines have been cultivated in Alsace for more than 2,000 years, thanks to the nearby Rhine river, and was an important wine producing region in the Germanic Holy Roman Empire. The Thirty Years War (1618 – 1648), the French Revolution (1789), the Napoleonic Wars and the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 caused the steady decline of the Alsace wine region. In fact, over the past few centuries several Franco-German conflicts have managed to relocate the border, making Alsace variously German then French. Thus, it’s no wonder the wines reflect so much of both countries.

Justly famous for its white wines, grape varieties here include: Riesling, Pinot Blanc, Gewurztraminer, Muscat, Pinot Gris, and Sylvaner. The terroir is varied, with mostly chalky soils as well as a heavier clay soil that nurtures Gewurztraminer best.

Join us as we talk with Etienne Hugel, whose family ties to the vineyards of Alsace extends back to 1639. We’ll hear a bit of history, vineyard and winemaking practices, and Etienne’s “noble mission” to continue to produce some of the world’s finest white wines.

For more information on the wines of Hugel & Fils: www.hugel.com/

Sponsor: 7th Annual Celebration of Food and Wine : www.balboabayclub.com

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Show #268
(1:17:12 min 55MB)

Randall Grahm on Bonny Doon

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Named after a logging camp in the idyllic region of California’s Santa Cruz Mountains, Bonny Doon Vineyard began as one man’s attempt to wade into wine with both feet and hands. As with many of us, Randall Grahm’s journey began innocently enough. Mix in a little Beverly Hills upbringing, a UC Santa Cruz education in philosophy and literature – and viola, you have a man convinced that if you can conceive growing the great American Pinot Noir, you can do it! Well, long story short, Pinot did in fact turn out to validate its title as ‘the heartbreak grape,’ and Randall, the ever cockeyed optimist that he is, decided to tackle something more…uh…. normal. Thus, running counter to established norms of the day, Randall decided to vest his future with Rhône varieties. Now, since this was 1983, it is fair to say that he was on the bleeding edge of things vinous.

As most listeners know, the names Bonny Doon and Randall Grahm easily became synonymous, along with Le Cigare Volant and Rhône Ranger. And so a movement was born, baptized and confirmed – all within a relatively short space of time. End of story? Not hardly. It’s a much longer (and stranger) journey than that.

Join us as we talk with Randall Grahm about the trials, tribulations and mentors of his life-consuming passion. We’ll even discuss biodynamics, screw caps, and his efforts to rein-in uncontrolled hedonism – all in an effort to return wine to the people.

For more information on Bonny Doon Vineyard: www.bonnydoonvineyard.com

Sponsor: VinAssure, Wine Preservation System: www.vinassure.com

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Show #267
(56:07 min 48MB)


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GrapeRadio is a wine talk show. Show topics cover issues such as the enjoyment of wine, wine news and industry trends - the hallmark of the show is interviews with world class guest (winemakers, vineyards owners, wine retail / wholesale leaders, restaurateurs and sommeliers). The scope of the show is international so expect to hear many guests from around the world.

GrapeRadio has received numerous awards and honors including the 2008 James Beard Award for excellence in Journalism.

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