Tag Archive for 'wine'

Vineyards of Sonoma County – with Charles Heintz

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Located in the Occidental region of Sonoma County, the Heintz Ranch has been owned by the Heintz family for nearly 100 years. Charlie’s grandparents purchased the land in 1912, and Charlie’s father farmed here. Apples remained in production until their first Chardonnay vineyard was planted in 1982. The family still maintains about 8 acres of apple orchard today.

Following in the footsteps of his father, Charlie began farming Heintz Ranch in 1984, and expanded the vineyards to include Pinot Noir and perhaps his personal favorite, Syrah. With a who’s who list of wineries like Littorai and Williams Selyem buying his grapes, Charlie Heintz couldn’t be prouder of his family’s accomplishments.

Join us as we talk with Charlie Heintz about viticulture and wine, and what it takes to be a premium winegrower.

For more info:

Charles Heintz Vineyards and Winery: www.heintzvineyards.com/

Sponsor: Wine Berserkers: www.wineberserkers.com

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Show #369
(51:42 min 49.7 MB)

Wineries of the California Central Coast – with Chamisal Vineyards

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Located half-way between San Francisco and Los Angeles, the Edna Valley is recognized as one of the finest Central Coast grape growing regions in California, known in particular for Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Rhone grape varieties. With the Pacific Ocean just a few miles away, the coastal fog and breezes combine to create one of the longest growing seasons. The climate, combined with the calcareous and volcanic soils of the area, results in wines with concentration and balancing acidity.

In 1973 Chamisal became the first winery to plant vines in Edna Valley, a gamble that paved the way for one of the most revered wine regions of California. The vineyard is named for the native, white-flowered Chamise plant that thrives on the property. In the early 1990’s after a period of dormancy, the vineyard was replanted and the estate was renamed Domain Alfred. New ownership began in 2008 and restored the original name – Chamisal Vineyard – to honor its place in Edna Valley history.

Join us as we talk with Chamisal winemaker Fintan DuFresne about the history, the vineyards, and the wines. We’ll even taste the new un-oaked Pinot for you!

For more info:

Chamisal Vineyards: www.ChamisalVineyards.com

Sponsor: Pinpoint Technologies – Your Business List Source: www.pinpoint-tech.com

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Show #362
(42:29 min 40.8 MB)

Wineries of South Africa – with Mulderbosch Vineyards

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Winegrowing has been going on in South Africa since the late 1600s, making it ‘the oldest of the New World producers.’ Thirty years ago, the region’s wines were of uneven quality – something that has demonstrably changed over the last ten or more years. The recent acquisition of Mulderbosch Vineyards by California–based Terroir Capital LLC is emblematic of these changes.

Join us as we talk with Adam Mason, winemaker for Mulderbosch Vineyards about this re-discovered region for such classic white varieties as sauvignon blanc and chenin blanc. You’ll find there’s more to South African wines than you imagined.

For more info:

Mulderbosch Vineyards: mulderbosch.co.za/

Sponsor: Best Wines Online: www.bestwinesonline.com

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Show #349
(1:10:39 min 67.8MB)

The Wines of Montalcino – with Alessandro Bindocci

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Alessandro Bindocci is the 4th generation of Bindocci’s to work in the wine business, and the 2nd generation to be following in the footsteps of Piero Talenti, mentor to Alessandro’s father Fabrizio and one of the founding fathers of the Brunello di Montalcino appellation.

After completing his enology degree at the University of Pisa, Alessandro returned to Montalcino to work with his father, bringing with him 21st century technology to one of Brunello’s oldest estates. Alessandro is winemaker for Tenuta Il Poggione, one of three original producers of Brunello di Montalcino, who began making wine in the late 19th century along with Biondi-Santi and Frescobaldi. Now owned by the Franceschi family, this estate has some of the oldest vines in the appellation.

Join us as we talk with Alessandro about Montalcino, the Tenuta Il Poggione wines, and a joint project between the Franceschi and Terlato families, named Mazzoni.

For more info:

The Montalcino Report: www.montalcinoreport.com
Live Like an Italian: livelikeanitalian.com

Sponsor: Wine Berserkers: www.wineberserkers.com

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Show #343
(41:19 min 39.7 MB)

The Versatility of Port

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The first shipments of wine under the name Port were recorded in 1678. In 1756 the Port wine vineyards of the Douro Valley in northern Portugal, became the first vineyard area in the world to be legally demarcated. Here, indigenous varieties of grapes, including the Touriga Franca, Tinta Roriz, Tinta Barroca, Touriga Nacional, Tinto Cão and Tinta Amarela are grown on the steep rocky hillsides bordering the Douro River. Many of the oldest vineyards, now classified as World Heritage, are planted on narrow terraces supported by hundreds of hand built dry stone walls.

Although the wine is produced inland in the vineyards of the upper Douro Valley, it takes its name from the coastal city of Oporto from which it is traditionally exported. Until well into the 20th century, the wine was carried down the river Douro from the vineyards in special boats known as barcos rabelos. The wine was then unloaded into the ‘lodges’ of the Port houses which line the narrow lanes of Vila Nova de Gaia opposite the old city centre of Oporto, to be aged, blended, bottled and finally shipped.

Join us as we talk with Robert Bower, Sales and Export Manager for the Fladgate Parternership and representing Croft, Taylor’s, and Fonseca. You’ll hear a little about Port’s history, its different styles, its food pairings, and most importantly, how to drink it!

For more info:

Fladgate Parternership: www.fladgatepartnership.com/

Sponsor: Best Wines Online: www.bestwinesonline.com

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Show #326
(1:01:13 min 56.0 MB)

Riesling from the Mosel – with S.A. Prüm

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The Mosel is one of 13 German wine regions and takes its name from the Moselle River. Before August, 2007 the region was called Mosel-Saar-Ruwer after the eponymous three river valleys. While it is Germany’s third largest in terms of production, it is the leading region in terms of international prestige. Known for its steep slopes, the region’s vineyards overlook the river and are famous for its wines made from the Riesling grape. Because of the northerly location of Mosel, the Riesling wines are often light, low in alcohol, crisp and high in acidity.

Here in the Mid-Mosel, the Prüm family has owned vineyards in the towns of Bernkastel, Graach, Wehlen and Zeltingen since 1156. Founded in 1911 by Sebastian Alois Prüm, S. A. Prüm has been guided by Raimund Prüm, head winemaker and Sebastian’s grandson, since 1971. Today, the estate comprises 40 acres of vineyards planted principally with Riesling. Over 15 acres of S.A. Prüm’s holdings are located within the famed Wehlener Sonnenuhr (“sundial of Wehlen”) domain. Named for the historic sundial painted on an outcrop of slate by a Prüm ancestor back in 1842, the incredibly steep Wehlener Sonnenuhr vineyard is a renowned source of what is arguably Germany’s finest Riesling. Here vines average 80 years and older and benefit from plentiful sunshine – a critical factor in the world’s northernmost wine producing country. The soil is comprised of layers of finely decomposed, mineral-rich blue slate. Underneath, deep-lying aquifers provide the vines with adequate water during dry periods.

Join us as we talk with Raimund Prüm, and his wife Pirjo Oksanen-Prüm, about S. A. Prüm, and the many faces of Riesling from the Mosel.

For more info:
S. A. Prüm: www.sapruem.com/

Palm Bay International: www.palmbay.com/sa-prum.htm

Sponsor: Wine Berserkers: www.wineberserkers.com

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Show #324
(1:28:40 min 81.2 MB)

2013 World of Pinot Noir Seminar – Terroir: the Soul of La Côte d’Or, Part 1

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Want to learn more about Burgundy? Well, there’s a seminar for that! You’ll be pleased to hear that the 2013 World of Pinot Noir presented a very nice and detailed glimpse of the region that you’re bound to find informative.

So, join us as we listen to Don Kinnan, CSS, CWE, and the lead instructor for the French Wine Society’s new Master Burgundy Certificate program, as he presents an in-depth seminar on the wines, soils, climate and history of the Côte d’Or. Don begins discussing the Côte de Nuits and the villages of Gevrey-Chambertin, Chambolle-Musigny, Vougeot, Vosne-Romanee. Then for the Côte de Beaune, Don focuses in on Beaune, Pommard, Volnay, and Puligny-Montrachet – all, in Part 1 of Terroir: the Soul of La Côte d’Or.

For more info:
World of Pinot Noir: www.worldofpinotnoir.com/

Slide Presentation at WOPN: Don Kinnan Burgundy Seminar

Sponsor: Millesima, Fine Wine Merchants: www.millesima-usa.com

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Show #322
(1:14:53 min 68.6 MB)

Temecula – A Case of Preconceived Notions?

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One doesn’t immediately think of Temecula when they think of California wine regions. Yet, along with the North Coast and the Central Coast, there is also a South Coast wine-growing region – a region which includes the Temecula Valley AVA. Located in a semi-rural section of Southern California’s Riverside County, the Temecula Valley is about an hour’s drive from Los Angeles, San Diego, Orange County and Palm Springs.

This close proximity to major population centers and relatively easy access has made Temecula a prime wine touring region – both for Southern Californians, and for visitors to the area. However, despite its convenient location, Temecula’s wine reputation has been hampered as much by uneven quality as by vineyard devastation ten years ago from Pierce’s Disease, a bacterial infection of the grapevine which causes the foliage, the fruit, and finally the vine to die off. Arguably, it hasn’t helped matters that the region easily became a tour-bus Mecca for much of Southern California. This, in turn, lured many wineries to adapt their operations to this type of tourist, largely the antithesis of the usual North or Central Coast winery visitor.

Grape growing isn’t new to the region, as Mission grapes had been planted in the Temecula area in 1820. In more modern times, Vincenzo and Audry Cilurzo established the first commercial vineyard in the Temecula Valley in 1968. Brookside Winery planted its vineyard in 1971, and produced the first wines from Temecula grapes. Callaway Vineyard and Winery began farming grapes in 1969, and opened the first Temecula Winery in 1974.

Most of the 34 wineries in Temecula are family-owned. Many are relatively new, having planted their grapes and/or opened their respective doors since the early 2000s. The timing is no accident, as most of the vineyards needed to be replanted after the damage by Pierce’s Disease. Yet, catastrophe often brings opportunity, and in this case many of the vineyards were replanted with more suitable varieties on better rootstalks, and grown using new viticultural techniques. Growers in the AVA practice sustainable farming in what has now become an agricultural preserve.

As new winemakers and new ideas continue to filter into the region, Temecula makes no apologies for the wines they grow, or how they market them. And, since the quality of their wines continues to rise, and the visitors continue to arrive – via bus or otherwise – the region seems poised to bolster its reputation.

Join us as we visit with nine vintners from Temecula Valley, to hear more about their approach to wine-growing and wine-making. There may be a lot more to Temecula wines than you think – presumptions aside, of course.

Sponsor: Pinpoint Tech – Your Mailing List Source: www.pinpoint-tech.com

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Show #283
(1:26:01 min 61MB)

Sustainability in the Vineyards

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In wine growing, the word “sustainability” gets bandied about frequently. So, what’s it really mean? Obviously, sustainability is the ability to continue on…to endure. So, with wine growing the term will usually mean that the grower uses farming methods that are least likely to harm the environment in general, and the farm in particular, so that it may ‘live long and prosper.’ But, philosophically, it actually goes well beyond that basic premise.

Sustainability in wine growing will normally involve both biological and philosophical approaches – such as organic farming or biodynamics, each of which is intended to conserve natural resources, protect and restore natural habitats, and protect the health of those doing the farming, and their neighbors and customers. It’s a lofty goal, but one that makes plenty of common as well as practical sense. So, how does one practice sustainability at a winery or vineyard? We’re glad you asked!

Join us as we talk with Jon Ruel, Director of Viticulture and Winemaking at Trefethen Vineyards, about the differences between terms like sustainably farmed, organic, certified organic, and biodynamic. As a family farm in Napa Valley for over 40 years, Trefethen has been making conscious decisions concerning long-term sustainability.

For more information on Trefethen Family Vineyards: www.trefethen.com

Sponsor: 7th Annual Celebration of Food and Wine : www.balboabayclub.com

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Show #269
(58:09 min 41MB)

For the Love of Food and Wine

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What distinguishes a fine restaurant? Most certainly, it takes an equal amount of desire and talent. But, it also takes an enormous passion for both food and wine – one that translates to the creation of inspired dishes as well as food and wine pairings that marvel the senses and keep customers returning for more.

Motivated by their interest for market-inspired ingredients (Marché Moderne translates as “modern market”) and classic French cooking techniques, Florent and Amelia Marneau have created a charming French bistro in the heart of Orange County, California. The Marneaus seem to relish integrating the urban and the rustic, the simple and the sophisticated, while creating dishes that are at once both modern and traditional. For decades, the couple has worked separately in some of the best kitchens in France and Orange County. Now, with Marché Moderne, they have followed their natural evolution by combining their culinary careers as independent restaurateurs.

Join us as we visit with Chef-owners Florent and Amelia Marneau of Marché Moderne restaurant. We’ll discuss their early influences, some of their kitchen techniques, and the important aspects of running a classic French bistro in Southern California.

To find out more information: Mache Moderne: www.marchemoderne.net

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Show #248
(57:54 min 37MB)

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GrapeRadio is a wine talk show. Show topics cover issues such as the enjoyment of wine, wine news and industry trends - the hallmark of the show is interviews with world class guest (winemakers, vineyards owners, wine retail / wholesale leaders, restaurateurs and sommeliers). The scope of the show is international so expect to hear many guests from around the world.

GrapeRadio has received numerous awards and honors including the 2008 James Beard Award for excellence in Journalism.

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