Archive Page 6

20 Years of Williams Selyem – Part 2

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As most people know, Burt and Ed sold the winery to John and Kathe Dyson in 1998, and Bob Cabral became new winemaker with the impossible task of replacing a legend in the wine world. Bob has strived to continue the tradition of excellence in crafting Williams Selyem wines, thus making the idea of a second “Bob Years” 10-year retrospective even more intriguing.

Join us for Part 2 as we hear from winemaker Bob Cabral about his trial by fire.

For More Info: World of Pinot Noir: www.worldofpinotnoir.com

Sponsor: Porter Family Vineyards – Napa Valley: www.porterfamilyvineyards.com

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Show #276
(48:33 min 34MB)

20 Years of Williams Selyem – Part 1

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In March of 2010, the World of Pinot Noir was celebrating its Tenth Anniversary. Something special ought to be done, the organizers thought. How about making one of the seminars a ten-year retrospective tasting from a well-known winery? Yes, that would be something special. However, when the retrospective covers ten years of Pinot Noirs from Williams Selyem, well it probably doesn’t get any better or more interesting than that. And of course, this is only Part 1 – Part 2 will cover the most recent 10 years next week.

From its humble beginnings in 1981, Burt Williams and Ed Selyem took their little garage project wine, originally named Hacienda Del Rio, to awards, kudos, and critical accolades. The wines were mostly sold via mailing list, but the wine’s reputation and scarcity only added to its allure, and ultimately, the wines became so popular that they started a waiting list to get on the mailing list.

Join us for Part 1 as we hear about the “Bert Years” from Williams Selyem’s current winemaker Bob Cabral and restaurateur Michael Jordan. A story that has become a legend in the world of pinot noir.

For More Info: World of Pinot Noir: www.worldofpinotnoir.com

Sponsor: Porter Family Vineyards – Napa Valley: www.porterfamilyvineyards.com

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Show #275
(1:06:37 min 48MB)

The Wines of C.P. Lin – Mountford Estate (New Zealand)

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Today show features the world’s only blind winemaker, C.P. Lin, of Mountford Estate in New Zealand

Taiwan-born C.P. Lin was a brilliant mathematics student at University of Canterbury who became captivated by wine through participation in a social wine club on campus. He realized early on that he had an extremely well-developed sense of smell. Lin was blinded by retinoblastoma (carcinoma of the retina) in both eyes at the age of three but was not deterred into becoming a winemaker. He attended enology and viticulture classes at Lincoln University but could not graduate because his disability prevented him from completing the practical lab work required for a degree. Nevertheless, he went on to work successfully in the wine industry and has brought Mountford Estate in Waipara to international prominence. The wines of Mountford Estate have become a cult wine, with only 2,000 cases produced of Pinot Gris, Riesling, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

Our in-studio interview with Lin, who visited the states recently, covers a wide range of wine and winemaking topics and is truly one of the most fascinating programs we have ever presented.

Sponsor: Porter Family Vineyards – Napa Valley: www.porterfamilyvineyards.com

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Show #274
(1:03:04 min 45MB)

Tasting 2008 Oregon Pinot Noir

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The 2008 vintage for Oregon Pinot Noir may be the greatest this decade and some have claimed it the best vintage in Oregon’s modern winegrowing history. I know you have heard this type of vintage hype many times before, but 2008 is the bomb in Oregon! The wines possess perfect balance with moderate alcohols and acidity harmonizing with ripe tannins and bright fruit. They are generally restrained at present, will need another few years in bottle to really shine, and many will easily last 15 years.

Join the Grape Radio crew as they taste 5 top 2008 Oregon Pinot Noirs: Willamette Valleys Vineyards Estate, Lange Estate Winery & Vineyards Estate, Lenne Estate Estate, Shea Wine Cellars Estate, and Privé Vineyard le sud Estate.

The program includes 16 questions on Oregon Pinot Noir. Test your Noiregon IQ!

Sponsor: Pinpoint Technologies: Mailing, Telemaketing, and Email List: www.pinpoint-tech.com

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Show #273
(55:21 min 39MB)

Wine, the Web, and Jancis Robinson

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Jancis Robinson has been writing about wine since 1975, authoring some of the world’s most respected books on the subject. She is a wine correspondent of the London Financial Times, and the first non-trade Master of Wine as well an OBE. She considers herself a contemporary of Robert Parker, as well as the author of several books – most notably a massive tome called The Oxford Companion to Wine – as well as several television shows and other broadcast media, Jancis is considered to be the one of the most (if not the most) prolific wine writers on the planet.

Join us as we talk with Jancis about wine, her career, her colleagues, and her huge impact on a generation and a half of wine consumers. We’ll discuss several of today’s hot button issues, and maybe tilt at a windmill or two in the process.

For more information on Jancis Robinson: www.jancisrobinson.com

Sponsor: VinAssure, Wine Preservation System: www.vinassure.com

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Show #272
(43:51 min 31MB)

All About Comté – Part 2

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Welcome to our video podcast: Comte – The Art of Cheese – Part 2 – Video Show #89.


If you like cheese, you’re probably familiar with Comté. This French semi-hard cheese made from unpasteurized cow’s milk has been produced for hundreds of years, and is still traditionally made in more than 190 cheese dairies, known as the “fruitières” in the Jura region of eastern France. The Jura plateau of the Franche-Comté is the most mountainous (and coldest) region of France stretching from the eastern edge of Burgundy through the foothills of the Jura Alps to the Alps along the border with Switzerland.

It is the first French AOC (label of origin) cheese, guaranteeing the quality of the cheese. Each 40 kilo (about 88 pound) wheel of Comté is made from the milk of many different small farms. The milk is collected at a fruitière, where it is manipulated and transformed under strictly controlled conditions. After its fabrication, the huge wheels of cheese are transferred to a limited number of cellars spread across the region, where they will age anywhere from 4 – 18 months. The taste is variable depending on the age and the season of the milk. It’s typically described as salty, mild, and fruity. Some cheese have strong hazelnut flavors, while others have subtle hints of nutmeg. Wine pairings? Dry whites and lighter reds work beautifully with Comté.

Join us for this first of two episodes covering this fascinating region. We’ll learn some of the history of this region, and what makes this part of France special, but more importantly, how this translates to Comté itself.

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All About Comté – Part 1

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Welcome to our video podcast: Comte – The Art of Cheese – Part 1 – Video Show #88.

If you like cheese, you’re probably familiar with Comté. This French semi-hard cheese made from unpasteurized cow’s milk has been produced for hundreds of years, and is still traditionally made in more than 190 cheese dairies, known as the “fruitières” in the Jura region of eastern France. The Jura plateau of the Franche-Comté is the most mountainous (and coldest) region of France stretching from the eastern edge of Burgundy through the foothills of the Jura Alps to the Alps along the border with Switzerland.

It is the first French AOC (label of origin) cheese, guaranteeing the quality of the cheese. Each 40 kilo (about 88 pound) wheel of Comté is made from the milk of many different small farms. The milk is collected at a fruitière, where it is manipulated and transformed under strictly controlled conditions. After its fabrication, the huge wheels of cheese are transferred to a limited number of cellars spread across the region, where they will age anywhere from 4 – 18 months. The taste is variable depending on the age and the season of the milk. It’s typically described as salty, mild, and fruity. Some cheese have strong hazelnut flavors, while others have subtle hints of nutmeg. Wine pairings? Dry whites and lighter reds work beautifully with Comté.

Join us for this first of two episodes covering this fascinating region. We’ll learn some of the history of this region, and what makes this part of France special, but more importantly, how this translates to Comté itself.

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Alice Feiring on Wine

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Alice Feiring should be no stranger to those who follow the personalities in the world of wine. An unapologetic Francophile and something of a firebrand, Alice considers herself “the leading Natural Wine Advocate in this country,” which puts her in direct conflict with influential wine critic Robert Parker, and those who seemingly favor Parker’s preference in wines. She has described most California wine as “overblown, over-alcoholed, over-oaked, overpriced and over-manipulated,” sparking more than a little controversy. Her recent book, The Battle for Wine and Love; Or How I Saved the World from Parkerization, has garnered her many supporters, as well as a slew of detractors.

Join us as we speak with author, journalist and activist for a more “natural wine,” Alice Feiring. We’ll discuss the definition of “natural wine” and its seeming importance, as well as her perception of the Parkerization of wines – world wide.

For more information on Alice Feiring: www.alicefeiring.com

Sponsor: Comté Cheese: www.comte-usa.com

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Show #271
(57:36 min 41MB)

Sonoma County Road Trip

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We decided to make a trek up to Sonoma County to visit with a few personalities from the Kendall-Jackson stable of wineries.

Our first stop was to visit with Melissa Stackhouse, winemaker for La Crema. The love for farming came naturally for Melissa, having spent summers on her grandparents’ farm in rural Minnesota. But, it was a visit to Washington State’s San Juan Islands that actually introduced her to wine. And, as they say in fishing, the hook was set. A UC Davis education was next on the agenda, followed by several internships which finally led her to La Crema in 2001 as assistant winemaker. By 2003, she was running the place.

Next, we were off to meet with Don Hartford at Hartford Family Winery in the Russian River Valley. Don attended University of Massachusetts at Amherst, obtained his law degree from Santa Clara University, and his legal career has included a Tokyo law firm, a large San Francisco-based firm, Jess Jackson’s practice of Constitutional law, and work at the California Supreme Court. The law notwithstanding, Don has immersed himself in winemaking and winery management over the past 20 years. He also owns and farms a small vineyard of old-vine Zinfandel behind his home. This 90-year old vineyard is located on seven acres and is head-pruned to produce annual yields of about 1.5 tons an acre. Almost by itself, stewardship of this property has returned Don to his Massachusetts farming roots.

Then, we spent some quality time with Randy Ullom, of Kendall-Jackson Estates. Randy was originally hired in 1993 by Jess Jackson as the winemaker at Camelot Vineyards. That same year, Jackson also put him in charge of heading up a new Chilean operation as founding winemaker and general manager of Viña Calina. Then in 1996, Ullom helped Jackson establish wine production in Argentina with the Tapiz label. In 1997, Ullom was made winemaster for Kendall-Jackson Winery. In 2006, he also became the company’s Chief Operating Officer, reflecting his intimate involvement in the both the viticultural and winemaking programs of Kendall-Jackson.

Finally, we talked with Alex Réblé, winemaker for Matanzas Creek. Originally from the Bordeaux region of France, Alex was educated at the Agricultural School of Libourne and Blanquefort and mentored by Jean-Claude Berrouet (then winemaker at Pétrus and La Fleur-Pétrus).  After working at Chateau La Tour Carnet for a year, Alex turned his attention to the New World. Wanting to try his hand with Burgundian varieties, he took a job at Willamette Valley Vineyards in Oregon, working with Joe Dobbes. Then, he was on to the Napa Valley in 1998, to work with Luc Morlet at Newton Vineyards, Ken Deis at Flora Springs Winery, and Daniel Baron at Silver Oak and Twomey. Finally, he joined Matanzas Creek in 2001 as cellar master, becoming its winemaker in 2010.

For more information on Jackson Family Wines: www.kj.com

Sponsor: VinAssure, Wine Preservation System : www.vinassure.com

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Show #270
(1:15:01 min 41MB)

Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker #5

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Welcome to our video podcast: Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker – Video Show #87.

On his recent trip to the Chateauneuf-Du-Pape, Robert Kenney was able to ask several well-known winemakers our last big question: “Why do you produce a Special Cuvee” — Film editing by Robert Farinhas.

Everyone has special barrels that seem to deliver more complex wine than the other barrels. Join us as we hear several interesting answers from some of Châteauneuf-du-Pape’s great winemakers about why, in addition to several other cuvees, they are intent on producing what is commonly referred to as a “special cuvee”?

Interviews include:
Julien Barrot — Domaine La Barroche
Vincent Durieu — Domaine Durieu
Francois Giraud — Domaine Giraud
Emilie Boisson — Domaine Du Pere Caboche
Laurence Feraud — Domaine Du Pegau
Alexandre Favier — Domaine Chante Cigale
Veronique Maret — Domaine De La Charbonniere
Nicolas Boiron — Domaine Bosquet Des Pape
Jean-Paul Versino — Domaine Bois De Boursan
Christian Voeux — Chateau La Nerthe
Thierry Sabon — Clos Du Mont-Olivet
Christophe Jaume — Domaine Grand Veneur
Sophie Armenier — Domaine De Marcoux
Mathieu Perrin — Chateau De Beaucastel
Laurent Charvin –Domaine Charvin
Baptiste Grangeon — Domaine De Christia
Isabelle Sabon — Domaine De La Janasse
Bruno Gaspard — Clos Du Caillou
Karine Diffonty — Cuvee Du Vatican
Didier Negron — Roger Sabon
Florent Lancon — Domaine De La Solitude
Frederic Coulon — Domaine De Beaurenard
Isabel Ferrando — Domaine Saint Prefert
Amelle Barrot — Chateau Jas De Bressy
Pierre Fabre — Chateau MontRedon
Vincent Maurel — Clos Saint Jean
Thierry Usseglio — Domaine Pierre Usseglio & Fils
Patrick Vernier — Chateau Cabrieres
Pierre Pastre — Chateau Fortia
Laurent Brotte — Brotte
Andre Brunel — Les Cailloux
Frederic Brunier — Domaine Du Vieux Telegraph
Guillaume Gonnet — Font De Michelle

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Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker #4

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Welcome to our video podcast: Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker – Video Show #86.

On his recent trip to the Chateauneuf-Du-Pape, Robert Kenney was able to ask several well-known winemakers our final burning question: “What do you prefer to drink besides Chateauneuf-du-Pape” — Film editing by Robert Farinhas.

Join us as we hear more than a few whimsical thoughts from some of world’s great winemakers about what they what they like to drink – when they’re not drinking CdP…as if!

Interviews include:
Julien Barrot — Domaine La Barroche
Vincent Durieu — Domaine Durieu
Francois Giraud — Domaine Giraud
Emilie Boisson — Domaine Du Pere Caboche
Laurence Feraud — Domaine Du Pegau
Alexandre Favier — Domaine Chante Cigale
Veronique Maret — Domaine De La Charbonniere
Nicolas Boiron — Domaine Bosquet Des Pape
Jean-Paul Versino — Domaine Bois De Boursan
Christian Voeux — Chateau La Nerthe
Thierry Sabon — Clos Du Mont-Olivet
Christophe Jaume — Domaine Grand Veneur
Sophie Armenier — Domaine De Marcoux
Mathieu Perrin — Chateau De Beaucastel
Laurent Charvin –Domaine Charvin
Baptiste Grangeon — Domaine De Christia
Isabelle Sabon — Domaine De La Janasse
Bruno Gaspard — Clos Du Caillou
Karine Diffonty — Cuvee Du Vatican
Didier Negron — Roger Sabon
Florent Lancon — Domaine De La Solitude
Frederic Coulon — Domaine De Beaurenard
Isabel Ferrando — Domaine Saint Prefert
Amelle Barrot — Chateau Jas De Bressy
Pierre Fabre — Chateau MontRedon
Vincent Maurel — Clos Saint Jean
Thierry Usseglio — Domaine Pierre Usseglio & Fils
Patrick Vernier — Chateau Cabrieres
Pierre Pastre — Chateau Fortia
Laurent Brotte — Brotte
Andre Brunel — Les Cailloux
Frederic Brunier — Domaine Du Vieux
Telegraph Guillaume Gonnet — Font De Michelle

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Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker #3

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Welcome to our video podcast: Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker – Video Show #85.

On his recent trip to the Chateauneuf-Du-Pape, Robert Kenney was able to ask several well-known winemakers another of our burning questions: “What’s the best advice you were ever given?” – Film editing by Robert Farinhas.

Join us as we hear some philosophical, practical, and whimsical thoughts from some of world’s great winemakers about what they was good or otherwise useful advice in their respective careers.

Interviews include:
Julien Barrot – Domaine La Barroche
Vincent Durieu – Domaine Durieu
Francois Giraud – Domaine Giraud
Emilie Boisson – Domaine Du Pere Caboche
Laurence Feraud – Domaine Du Pegau
Alexandre Favier – Domaine Chante Cigale
Veronique Maret – Domaine De La Charbonniere
Nicolas Boiron – Domaine Bosquet Des Pape
Jean-Paul Versino – Domaine Bois De Boursan
Christian Voeux – Chateau La Nerthe
Thierry Sabon – Clos Du Mont-Olivet
Christophe Jaume – Domaine Grand Veneur
Sophie Armenier – Domaine De Marcoux
Mathieu Perrin – Chateau De Beaucastel
Laurent Charvin –Domaine Charvin
Baptiste Grangeon – Domaine De Christia
Isabelle Sabon – Domaine De La Janasse
Bruno Gaspard – Clos Du Caillou
Karine Diffonty – Cuvee Du Vatican
Didier Negron – Roger Sabon
Florent Lancon – Domaine De La Solitude
Frederic Coulon – Domaine De Beaurenard
Isabel Ferrando – Domaine Saint Prefert
Amelle Barrot – Chateau Jas De Bressy
Pierre Fabre – Chateau MontRedon
Vincent Maurel – Clos Saint Jean
Thierry Usseglio – Domaine Pierre Usseglio & Fils
Patrick Vernier – Chateau Cabrieres
Pierre Pastre – Chateau Fortia
Laurent Brotte – Brotte
Andre Brunel – Les Cailloux
Frederic Brunier – Domaine Du Vieux Telegraph
Guillaume Gonnet – Font De Michelle

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Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker #2

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Welcome to our video podcast: Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker – Video Show #84.

On a recent trip to the Chateauneuf-Du-Pape, Robert Kenney was able to ask several well-known winemakers one of our usual burning questions: “What’s Unique about Chateauneuf-du-Pape?” – Film editing by Robert Farinhas.

Join us as we hear some philosophical, practical, and whimsical thoughts from some of world’s great winemakers about what they feel makes their region so unique, different or special.

Interviews include:
Julien Barrot – Domaine La Barroche
Vincent Durieu – Domaine Durieu
Francois Giraud – Domaine Giraud
Emilie Boisson – Domaine Du Pere Caboche
Laurence Feraud – Domaine Du Pegau
Alexandre Favier – Domaine Chante Cigale
Veronique Maret – Domaine De La Charbonniere
Nicolas Boiron – Domaine Bosquet Des Pape
Jean-Paul Versino – Domaine Bois De Boursan
Christian Voeux – Chateau La Nerthe
Thierry Sabon – Clos Du Mont-Olivet
Christophe Jaume – Domaine Grand Veneur
Sophie Armenier – Domaine De Marcoux
Mathieu Perrin – Chateau De Beaucastel
Laurent Charvin –Domaine Charvin
Baptiste Grangeon – Domaine De Christia
Isabelle Sabon – Domaine De La Janasse
Bruno Gaspard – Clos Du Caillou
Karine Diffonty – Cuvee Du Vatican
Didier Negron – Roger Sabon
Florent Lancon – Domaine De La Solitude
Frederic Coulon – Domaine De Beaurenard
Isabel Ferrando – Domaine Saint Prefert
Amelle Barrot – Chateau Jas De Bressy
Pierre Fabre – Chateau MontRedon
Vincent Maurel – Clos Saint Jean
Thierry Usseglio – Domaine Pierre Usseglio & Fils
Patrick Vernier – Chateau Cabrieres
Pierre Pastre – Chateau Fortia
Laurent Brotte – Brotte
Andre Brunel – Les Cailloux
Frederic Brunier – Domaine Du Vieux Telegraph
Guillaume Gonnet – Font De Michelle

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Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker #1

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Welcome to our video podcast: Châteauneuf du Pape – Ask the Wine Maker – Video Show #83.

On a recent trip to the Chateauneuf-Du-Pape, Robert Kenney was able to ask winemakers one of our burning questions: “If you weren’t making wine, what would you be doing?” – Film editing by Robert Farinhas.

Join us as we hear some philosophical, practical, and whimsical thoughts from some of world’s great winemakers about what they might do if they had never gotten into wine. Interviews include:

Julien Barrot – Domaine La Barroche
Vincent Durieu – Domaine Durieu
Francois Giraud – Domaine Giraud
Emilie Boisson – Domaine Du Pere Caboche
Laurence Feraud – Domaine Du Pegau
Alexandre Favier – Domaine Chante Cigale
Veronique Maret – Domaine De La Charbonniere
Nicolas Boiron – Domaine Bosquet Des Pape
Jean-Paul Versino – Domaine Bois De Boursan
Christian Voeux – Chateau La Nerthe
Thierry Sabon – Clos Du Mont-Olivet
Christophe Jaume – Domaine Grand Veneur
Sophie Armenier – Domaine De Marcoux
Mathieu Perrin – Chateau De Beaucastel
Laurent Charvin –Domaine Charvin
Baptiste Grangeon – Domaine De Christia
Isabelle Sabon – Domaine De La Janasse
Bruno Gaspard – Clos Du Caillou
Karine Diffonty – Cuvee Du Vatican
Didier Negron – Roger Sabon
Florent Lancon – Domaine De La Solitude
Frederic Coulon – Domaine De Beaurenard
Isabel Ferrando – Domaine Saint Prefert
Amelle Barrot – Chateau Jas De Bressy
Pierre Fabre – Chateau MontRedon
Vincent Maurel – Clos Saint Jean
Thierry Usseglio – Domaine Pierre Usseglio & Fils
Patrick Vernier – Chateau Cabrieres
Pierre Pastre – Chateau Fortia
Laurent Brotte – Brotte
Andre Brunel – Les Cailloux
Frederic Brunier – Domaine Du Vieux Telegraph
Guillaume Gonnet – Font De Michelle

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Sustainability in the Vineyards

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In wine growing, the word “sustainability” gets bandied about frequently. So, what’s it really mean? Obviously, sustainability is the ability to continue on…to endure. So, with wine growing the term will usually mean that the grower uses farming methods that are least likely to harm the environment in general, and the farm in particular, so that it may ‘live long and prosper.’ But, philosophically, it actually goes well beyond that basic premise.

Sustainability in wine growing will normally involve both biological and philosophical approaches – such as organic farming or biodynamics, each of which is intended to conserve natural resources, protect and restore natural habitats, and protect the health of those doing the farming, and their neighbors and customers. It’s a lofty goal, but one that makes plenty of common as well as practical sense. So, how does one practice sustainability at a winery or vineyard? We’re glad you asked!

Join us as we talk with Jon Ruel, Director of Viticulture and Winemaking at Trefethen Vineyards, about the differences between terms like sustainably farmed, organic, certified organic, and biodynamic. As a family farm in Napa Valley for over 40 years, Trefethen has been making conscious decisions concerning long-term sustainability.

For more information on Trefethen Family Vineyards: www.trefethen.com

Sponsor: 7th Annual Celebration of Food and Wine : www.balboabayclub.com

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Show #269
(58:09 min 41MB)

The Wine of Alsace

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Wines from Alsace – are they more German or more French? Well, they’re a little of both, owing not the least to its geographical location on France’s eastern border and on the west bank of the upper Rhine adjacent to Germany. Vines have been cultivated in Alsace for more than 2,000 years, thanks to the nearby Rhine river, and was an important wine producing region in the Germanic Holy Roman Empire. The Thirty Years War (1618 – 1648), the French Revolution (1789), the Napoleonic Wars and the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 caused the steady decline of the Alsace wine region. In fact, over the past few centuries several Franco-German conflicts have managed to relocate the border, making Alsace variously German then French. Thus, it’s no wonder the wines reflect so much of both countries.

Justly famous for its white wines, grape varieties here include: Riesling, Pinot Blanc, Gewurztraminer, Muscat, Pinot Gris, and Sylvaner. The terroir is varied, with mostly chalky soils as well as a heavier clay soil that nurtures Gewurztraminer best.

Join us as we talk with Etienne Hugel, whose family ties to the vineyards of Alsace extends back to 1639. We’ll hear a bit of history, vineyard and winemaking practices, and Etienne’s “noble mission” to continue to produce some of the world’s finest white wines.

For more information on the wines of Hugel & Fils: www.hugel.com/

Sponsor: 7th Annual Celebration of Food and Wine : www.balboabayclub.com

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Show #268
(1:17:12 min 55MB)

Randall Grahm on Bonny Doon

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Named after a logging camp in the idyllic region of California’s Santa Cruz Mountains, Bonny Doon Vineyard began as one man’s attempt to wade into wine with both feet and hands. As with many of us, Randall Grahm’s journey began innocently enough. Mix in a little Beverly Hills upbringing, a UC Santa Cruz education in philosophy and literature – and viola, you have a man convinced that if you can conceive growing the great American Pinot Noir, you can do it! Well, long story short, Pinot did in fact turn out to validate its title as ‘the heartbreak grape,’ and Randall, the ever cockeyed optimist that he is, decided to tackle something more…uh…. normal. Thus, running counter to established norms of the day, Randall decided to vest his future with Rhône varieties. Now, since this was 1983, it is fair to say that he was on the bleeding edge of things vinous.

As most listeners know, the names Bonny Doon and Randall Grahm easily became synonymous, along with Le Cigare Volant and Rhône Ranger. And so a movement was born, baptized and confirmed – all within a relatively short space of time. End of story? Not hardly. It’s a much longer (and stranger) journey than that.

Join us as we talk with Randall Grahm about the trials, tribulations and mentors of his life-consuming passion. We’ll even discuss biodynamics, screw caps, and his efforts to rein-in uncontrolled hedonism – all in an effort to return wine to the people.

For more information on Bonny Doon Vineyard: www.bonnydoonvineyard.com

Sponsor: VinAssure, Wine Preservation System: www.vinassure.com

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Show #267
(56:07 min 48MB)

Casa Lapostolle and the Wines of Chile

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Although it is considered New World, Chile has been growing wine since the 16th century, when the Spanish conquistadors brought vitis vinifera vines with them during their colonization of the region. About the mid-18th century, several French grape varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Carmenère were also introduced to the region.

Chile’s five viticultural regions occupy an 800 mile stretch, in a country 2,700 miles long and 109 miles wide. The most common red grapes grown are Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Carmenère – a grape originally from the Medoc region, but which has all but disappeared from Bordeaux since the phylloxera epidemic of the late 19th Century.

During the early 1980s, Chilean wineries modernized their production, bringing in stainless steel tanks for fermentation and oak barrels for aging. These were fast times, and the number of wineries grew from 12 in 1995 to over 70 in 2005. The increase in production was matched with wine exports as well, with Chile becoming the fifth largest exporter of wines, and the ninth largest producer in the world.

Join us as we talk with Andrea Leon, winemaker for Casa Lapostolle. Founded by Alexandra Marnier Lapostolle, her husband Cyril de Bournet and Don José Rabat Gorchs, Casa Lapostolle began as an effort to blend French expertise with Chilean terroir. Certified as Carbon Neutral for its recycling and renewable energy efforts, the winery practices biodynamic farming, and have been a leader in the “Green” movement in Chile.

For more information on Casa Lapostolle: www.casalapostolle.com

Sponsor: VinAssure, Wine Preservation System: www.vinassure.com

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Show #266
(1:02:07 min 48MB)


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GrapeRadio is a wine talk show. Show topics cover issues such as the enjoyment of wine, wine news and industry trends - the hallmark of the show is interviews with world class guest (winemakers, vineyards owners, wine retail / wholesale leaders, restaurateurs and sommeliers). The scope of the show is international so expect to hear many guests from around the world.

GrapeRadio has received numerous awards and honors including the 2008 James Beard Award for excellence in Journalism.

GrapeRadio has been the subject of numerous news reports by: The New York Times, Business Week, CNN, The Financial Times of London, and Wired Magazine.